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June 24, 2012

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Vickie Lach

Here are my answers to this week's challenge:

1.The ice cream truck entered the neighborhood and turned on its loudspeaker.
2.The loudspeaker sputtered to life, and children came running.
3.Children were not the only patrons of the ice cream truck, but the adults tended to arrive more slowly.
4.Icy-cold confections soon moved through the neighborhood and dripped multicolored sweetness on the sidewalks.
5.A dog licked the sticky pavement under its owner's feet, and a cat looked disdainfully down from its perch on a porch railing.
6.The truck trundled to the end of the block and turned out into the traffic of the main street, but it left an indelible mark on the memories of the children.

Vickie Lach

One rule I have learned that makes it easy to know whether to put in a comma or not: if the conjunction in a phrase is followed by a phrase that begins with a noun, you need a comma because that is a complete sentence. If there is no noun, then a comma isn't needed. Example:

1. The ice cream truck entered the neighborhood and turned on its loudspeaker.
(No comma is needed because the phrase "turned on its loudspeaker" does not begin with a noun.)

However

2.The loudspeaker sputtered to life, and children came running.
(Put in comma because the phrase "children came running" is a complete sentence.

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